‘A Species of Knowledge’: Women and Medicine 1750-1850

Tickets are still available for the “‘A Species of Knowledge’: Women and Medicine 1750-1850” interdisciplinary symposium!

April 5, 12:30-6pm Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts

For tickets visit Eventbrite here more information about the speakers, including keynote speaker Professor Hilary Marland, available on the symposium website.

I will be presenting: ‘Seniority, Experience, and On-the-job Training at British Naval Hospitals 1775-1815’

Joint Meeting of Agnes Dillion Randolph International Nursing History Conference and SAHMS

Program Cover Photo: University of Virginia Hospital operating theater, 1913. ECBCNHI Photograph Collection.

This past week I attended the joint meeting of the 4th Annual Agnes Dillion Randolph International Nursing History conference and the Southern Association for the History of Medicine and Science in Charlottesville, Virginia. It was great to reconnect with nursing history colleagues in North America and kick off the spring conference season with an excellent conference.

My presentation was part of session Session 2A – Military Nursing
Moderator: Marian MoserJones

  1. Two Directors of Nursing ContrastedCarol Helmstadter
  2. Nursing on British Naval Hospital Ships, 1790-1815 Erin Spinney
  3. Military Nurses of the Vietnam War: Tenacity, Courage, and LossLorelei Stein

The campus was quite beautiful as well.

Windy but sunny day so for walking on campus

Society for the Social History of Medicine 2018

Excited to join my history of medicine and history of nursing colleagues at the SSHM 2018!  My paper “Nursing Careers at Haslar and Plymouth Naval Hospitals, 1769-1800” counters historiographical preconceptions about pre-Nightingale nursing through a detailed analysis of the nursing workforce at Plymouth and Haslar Naval Hospitals, in conjunction with the nursing regulations for naval medical care. As the experiences of nurses at Plymouth Naval Hospital show, the physical stability of naval hospitals allowed for nurses to develop healing and care skills over a period of longstanding employment.

The full conference programme is available here.

Presenting at “Redcoats, Tommies, and Dusty Warriors: Britain’s Soldiers c.1650 to the present”

I’m heading to Leeds for the day to present at the “Redcoats, Tommies, and Dusty Warriors: Britain’s Soldiers c.1650 to the present” conference.  My paper “‘An awkward clumsy man’: Perceptions of female nurses and male orderlies in the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars” demonstrates the at times contradictory views of female nurses and male orderlies in regimental and general hospitals.  This is achieved through an examination of regulatory literature which highlights the officially endorsed ambiguity of the roles of nurses and orderlies in regimental and general hospitals while letters, memoirs, and medical treatises are used to showcase contemporary understandings of medical practitioners and military authorities on the provision of medical care in the army.

The conference programme is available here.